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Antony Gormley creating sculpture out of 22 iron blocks to mark 400 years since Mayflower set sail

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Angel of the North artist Sir Antony Gormley is creating a three tonne, 12ft tall sculpture, out of 22 iron blocks to mark 400 years since the Founding Fathers set sail for America

  • Sir Antony Gormley is creating his first public artwork in five years that will comprise 22 individual iron blocks
  • The Angel of the North artist made LOOK II to mark the 400 year anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower
  • The twice life-size figure will weigh three tonnes and stand 3.7 metres tall overlooking the sea in Plymouth

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Angel of the North artist Sir Antony Gormley is creating his first public artwork in five years to mark the 400 year anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower.

Gormley’s sculpture called LOOK II, will be feature as part of The Box, Plymouth. 

The sculpture – known as LOOK II – will comprise 22 individual iron blocks that have been cast as one single element to create a twice life-size figure. 

Once complete it will weigh three tonnes and stand 12.2ft tall overlooking the sea in Plymouth, Devon. 

It was commissioned by The Box – a new museum set to open in May – to mark 400 years since the Founding Fathers set sail from Plymouth to America.

LOOK II will be made up of 22 individual iron blocks and will weigh three tonnes and stand 3.7 metres tall once it has been completed

LOOK II will be made up of 22 individual iron blocks and will weigh three tonnes and stand 3.7 metres tall once it has been completed

The making of Antony Gormley's sculpture LOOK II, which ill be part of The Box, Plymouth, Devon

The making of Antony Gormley’s sculpture LOOK II, which ill be part of The Box, Plymouth, Devon

Antony Gormley's digital drawing for LOOK II

Antony Gormley’s digital drawing for LOOK II

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